Disturbance Ecology Lectures : 1. Extreme Weather & Ecosystem Functions 2. Ecology of Landslides

July 21, 2015: Dr. Anke Jentsch, University of Bayreuth, Germany & Dr. Lawrence R. Walker, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Continue reading Disturbance Ecology Lectures : 1. Extreme Weather & Ecosystem Functions 2. Ecology of Landslides

Adam, Jason and Pete build a home for less than $50,000

Dreaming of owning your own home but convinced you can’t afford it? This week Adam, Jason and Pete team up for one of our biggest makes ever, literally building a home from scratch for under $50,000 – using a shipping container!

Farm of the Future Documentary and Ecosystem Restoration Documentary (Full Documentaries)

Farm of the Future Documentary and Ecosystem Restoration Documentary (Full Documentaries).

This is a Wonderful documentary.

It’s part of a series of exciting and informative documentaries. This Youtube channel is for learning and educational purposes. Learning and Education are fundamental and important in today’s society and becoming increasingly more accessible and convenient online.
Continue reading Farm of the Future Documentary and Ecosystem Restoration Documentary (Full Documentaries)

AP News :New findings spark hope that endangered species are more abundant than previously thought

HEADLINE: New study finds more marine life in deep depths.
CAPTION: New findings spark hope that endangered species are more abundant than previously thought. (Dec. 2)

It is the twilight zone of the world’s oceans.
Until now, the area between the bright shallow coral reefs and deepest ocean depths, has been little known and poorly understood.
“The zone is dark and then the next thing that strikes you is this incredibly lush environment teeming with big groupers, big snappers, sharks.”
(Dr Michael Dowgiallo, NOAA)
New studies into low light reef systems _ these are off the coast of Puerto Rico _ have found an unexpected wealth of marine life.
While traditional scuba limits how deep researchers can go _ and expensive submersibles tend to explore at great depths _ rebreathers and new technical diving has opened up areas previously unchartered. A sweet spot in between.
(graphic)
Dr Richard Appeldoorn heads the University of Puerto Rico’s research team.


“It was really eye opening to see high densities of corals and lots of fish. // The larger species that we are looking at are all species in shallow areas have become extremely rare or actually threatened.”
(Richard Appeldoorn, Executive Director Caribbean Coral Reef institute)


Oceanographer Dr Michael Dowgiallo hopes these low light reefs hold the key to replenishing exhausted fisheries.
“The thing that is most spectacular is that you have this thriving ecosystem that’s right next to an ecosystem that’s been largely depleted of some of these more abundant and very important top predators.”
A similar NOAA-sponsored program in Hawaii has uncovered dozens of new fish species.
Researchers are worried that this largely unexplored environment is under threat – from overfishing, pollution, habitat destruction and climate change.
“The fact that it is so inaccessible right now makes it a refuge of sorts and will probably be unexploited for at least a while longer.”
By overcoming their physical limitations, researchers are now scrambling to shine more light on the new marine life they’ve discovered.
Tracy Brown
The Associated Press

You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/1e4c0e9dcf6b98da57aa2b05d0db0673
Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork

AP News: THREATENED SPECIES WORSE THEN PREVIOUSLY BELIEVED

English/Nat
XFA
The global extinction crisis is as bad – or worse – than previously believed, according to the World Conservation Union’s Red List of Threatened Species.
The report released on Thursday is the most comprehensive analysis of global conservation ever undertaken, auditing species around the globe.
Its findings are more alarming than expected – some 11-thousand plants and animals could be disappearing forever.
Since the last such assessment in 1996, the number of mammals identified as critically endangered increased from 169 to 180.
The number of critically endangered birds rose from 168 to 182.
According to the 2000 Red List, one in every four mammals and one in every eight birds is at risk of disappearing from our planet forever.


“Critically endangered species are ones that are hanging on by the skin of their teeth. There are very, very few individuals left of a lot of these animals, and in some cases you’re looking at just dozens of individuals, in other cases, maybe hundreds, and at best, low thousands, so we’re talking about these creatures being in very, very critical situations, and really could go over the edge at any time.”
( Russel Mittermeier, President, Conservation International)


And scientists acknowledge that even a study of this magnitude only scratches the surface.
Earth is home to an estimated 14 million species, yet only one-point-seven five million have been documented.
Many may become extinct before they are even identified, much less assessed by scientists.
Primates appear to be at particularly high risk.
The number of critically endangered primates has increased by nearly 50 percent over the last four years.


“Combining endangered and critically endangered primates, you’re looking at about one in every four species of primates being in some danger of extinction, either in the next few years or over the next couple of decades. And that’s really quite frightening, especially when you consider the importance of these animals and that they are our closest living relatives.”
(Russel Mittermeier, President, Conservation International)


Conservationists estimate that the current extinction rate is one thousand to ten thousand times higher than it should be under natural conditions.
The primary reason – humans.
Everything from expanding cities to deforestation, agriculture and fishing pose a significant threat to the planet’s biodiversity.
And scientists say, if we don’t change our ways, many of our most loved creatures will go the way of the flightless Dodo bird.


“If somebody went and torched the Smithsonian or set fire to the Metropolitan in New York, or took the Mona Lisa and ran it through the office shredding machine, everybody would be horrified, and yet every day, every week, we’re losing ecosystems, we’re losing hundreds if not thousands of species around the world.”
(Russel Mittermeier/President, Conservation International)


The report finds the most pervasive threat to mammals, plants and birds is habitat loss and degradation.
Scientists believe the best way to protect some of these endangered creatures is to build new protected areas in regions facing grave danger, such as Indonesia, India, Brazil and China, where the largest number of species are at risk.
The report comes a week before the second World Conservation Congress in Amman, Jordan, where members of the World Conservation Union will meet to define global conservation policy for the next four years.

You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/275086b98836189017757b36fe9a98f2
Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork

Disneynature’s Monkey Kingdom Official US Trailer 2

MOVIE TRAILER 2015 Disneynature’s Monkey Kingdom Official US Trailer 2

Disneynature’s eighth True Life Adventure—Monkey Kingdom – swings onto Blu-ray, Digital HD & Disney Movies Anywhere Sept 15

Continue reading Disneynature’s Monkey Kingdom Official US Trailer 2

Conservation and Restoration Ecology: Crash Course Ecology #12

Hank wraps up the Crash Course on ecology by taking a look at the growing fields of conservation biology and restoration ecology, which use all the kung fu moves we’ve learned about in the past eleven weeks and apply them to protecting ecosystems and to cleaning up the messes that we’ve already made.

Like Crash Course: http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse
Follow Crash Course: http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse

Table of Contents
1) Types of Diversity 3:00
2) Conservation Biology 4:12
A) Small Population Conservation 4:26
B) Declining Population Conservation 5:50
3) Restoration Ecology 7:06
A) Structural Restoration 7:30
B) Bioremediation 7:48
C) Biological Augmentation 8:03

References and image licenses for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-3DIH Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

Pollution: Crash Course Ecology #11

Hank talks about the last major way humans are impacting the environment in this penultimate episode of Crash Course Ecology. Pollution takes many forms – from the simplest piece of litter to the more complex endocrine distruptors – and ultimately, humans are responsible for it all.

Like Crash Course: http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse
Follow Crash Course: http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse
T*mbl Crash Course: http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com

Table of Contents

1) Natural Compounds 01:12:1
a) Carbon 01:35
b) Nitrogen and Phosphorous 02:11:2
c) Cyanide 04:05
d) Mercury 05:15
e) Sulfur & Nitrogen Dioxide 05:58

2) Synthetic Compounds 06:51
a) Endocrine Disruptors 07:09

References for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-3wpP Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

5 Human Impacts on the Environment: Crash Course Ecology #10

Hank gives the run down on the top five ways humans are negatively impacting the environment and having detrimental effects on the valuable ecosystem services which a healthy biosphere provides.

Like Crash Course? http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse
Follow Crash Course! http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse
T*mbl Crash Course: http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com

Table of Contents
Ecosystem Services 00:51
The Importance of Biodiversity 04:07
Deforestation 06:42
Desertification 06:49
Global Warming 07:59
Invasive Species 08:51
Overharvesting 09:20

Crash Course/SciShow videos referenced in this episode:
Hydrologic and Carbon Cycles: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2D7hZpIYlCA
Nitrogen and Phosphorus Cycles: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=leHy-Y_8nRs
Ecological Succession: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZKIHe2LDP8
Climate Change: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M2Jxs7lR8ZI
Invasive Species: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eDOwTXobJ3k
Food Shortage: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bPLJP84xL9A

References and image licenses for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-3n5P Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

Nitrogen & Phosphorus Cycles: Always Recycle! Part 2 – Crash Course Ecology #9

Hank describes the desperate need many organisms have for nutrients (specifically nitrogen and phosphorus) and how they go about getting them via the nitrogen and phosphorus cycles.

Like Crash Course! http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse
Follow Crash Course! http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse

Table of Contents

Nitrogen Cycle 1:46
Nitrogen Fixing Bacteria 2:32
Nitrifying Bacteria 3:24
Denitrifying Bacteria 4:34
Phosphorous Cycle 5:16
Lithosphere 5:27
Plants 5:56
Animals 5:56
Decomposers 5:56
Aquatic & Marine Ecosystems 6:24
Sedimentation & Weathering 6:55
Synthetic Fertilizers 7:23

References and image licenses for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-3fDT Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

The Hydrologic and Carbon Cycles: Always Recycle! – Crash Course Ecology #8

Hank introduces us to biogeochemical cycles by describing his two favorites: carbon and water. The hydrologic cycle describes how water moves on, above, and below the surface of the Earth, driven by energy supplied by the sun and wind. The carbon cycle does the same… for carbon!

Like Crash Course: http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse
Follow Crash Course: http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse

Table of Contents

1) Hydrologic Cycle – 1:15
A) Clouds – 2:13
B) Runoff – 3:06
C) Oceans – 3:41
D) Evapotranspiration – 4:25

2) Carbon Cycle – 5:12
A) Plants – 5:48
B) Fossil Fuels – 6:40
C) Oceans – 7:12
D) Global Warming – 7:35

References and image licenses for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-3flG Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

Ecosystem Ecology: Links in the Chain – Crash Course Ecology #7

Hank brings us to the next level of ecological study with ecosystem ecology, which looks at how energy, nutrients, and materials are getting shuffled around within an ecosystem (a collection of living and nonliving things interacting in a specific place), and which basically comes down to who is eating who.

Like Crash Course! http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse
Follow Crash Course! http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse

Table of Contents
1) Defining Ecosystems 0:49:1
2) Trophic Structure 4:44:1
a) Primary Producers 5:27
b) Primary Consumers 5:41
c) Secondary Consumers 5:49:1
d) Tertiary Consumers 5:58:2
e) Detrivores 6:08:1
3) Bioaccumulation 8:47

References and image licenses for this episode in the Google doc here: http://dft.ba/-3f2M Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

Ecological Succession: Change is Good – Crash Course Ecology #6

In the world of ecology, the only constant is change – but change can be good. Today Hank explains ecological succession and how ecological communities change over time to become beautiful, biodiverse mosaics.

Like Crash Course on Facebook! http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse
Follow Crash Course on Twitter! http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse

Table of Contents
1. Primary Succession 1:56:1
2. Secondary Succession 3:36
3. Climax Community Model 5:11
4. Intermediate Disturbance Hypothesis 7:25:1

References and image licenses for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-381q Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

Community Ecology II: Predators – Crash Course Ecology #5

Hank gets to the more violent part of community ecology by describing predation and the many ways prey organisms have developed to avoid it.

Like SciShow: http://www.facebook.com/scishow
Follow SciShow: http://www.twitter.com/scishow

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Herbivory and Parasitism 1:43
Predatory Adaptation 3:39
Cryptic Coloration 4:25
Mullerian Mimicry 5:43
Batesian Mimicry 6:38

References and image licenses for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-37Ki

Thanks to the Boone and Crockett Club for letting us film the introduction to this video in their headquarters here in Missoula: http://www.boone-crockett.org/about/about_headquarters.asp?area=about Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

Community Ecology: Feel the Love – Crash Course Ecology #4

Interactions between species are what define ecological communities, and community ecology studies these interactions anywhere they take place. Although interspecies interactions are mostly competitive, competition is pretty dangerous, so a lot of interactions are actually about side-stepping direct competition and instead finding ways to divvy up resources to let species get along. Feel the love?

Like CrashCourse! http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse
Follow CrashCourse! http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse

Table of Contents
1) Competitive Exclusion Principle 2:02
2) Fundamental vs. Realized Niche 3:48
3) Eco-lography / Resource Partitioning 5:25
4) Character Displacement 7:29
5) Mutualism 9:15
6) Commensalism 9:55

References for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-2YuA

crashcourse, ecology, biology, competition, evolution, survival, habitat, species, interaction, communities, community ecology, resource, animal, limiting factors, competitive exclusion principle, success, paramecium, competitive advantage, extinction, food, prey, diversity, life, adaptation, niche, security, stability, fundamental niche, realized niche, conflict, nature, natural order, robert macarthur, warbler, ecologist, yale, resource partitioning, observation, zone, hunting, foraging, coexist, organism, selection, character displacement, peter grant, rosemary grant, galapagos finches, trait, mutualism, commensalism, mycorrhizae, termite, obligate mutualism, barnacle Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

Human Population Growth – Crash Course Ecology #3

If being alive on Earth were a contest, humans would win it hands down. We’re like the Michael Phelps of being alive, but with 250,000 times more gold medals. Today Hank is here to tell us the specifics of why and how human population growth has happened over the past hundred and fifty years or so, and how those specifics relate to ecology.

Like CrashCourse? http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse
Follow CrashCourse! http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse

Table of Contents
1) R vs. K Selection Theory 01:41:1
2) Causes of Exponential Human Growth 03:24
3) Human Carrying Capacity 03:30:2
4) Ecological Footprints 06:40:1
5) Causes for Decline in Human Growth Rate 08:10:1 Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

Population Ecology: The Texas Mosquito Mystery – Crash Course Ecology #2

Population ecology is the study of groups within a species that interact mostly with each other, and it examines how they live together in one geographic area to understand why these populations are different in one time and place than they are in another. How is that in any way useful to anyone ever? Hank uses the example a of West Nile virus outbreak in Texas to show you in this episode of Crash Course: Ecology.

Like Crash Course? http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse
Follow Crash Course! http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse

Table of Contents
1) Density & Dispersion 02:03
2) Population Growth 03:07
3) Limiting Factors 03:45
a) Density Dependent 06:16
b) Density Independent 07:11
4) Exponential & Logistical Growth 08:04
5) How to Calculate Growth Rate 09:33

References:
http://www.latimes.com/news/nation/nationnow/la-na-nn-west-nile-virus-20120817,0,2506584.story
http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/idcu/disease/arboviral/westnile/information/general/myths/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mosquito
http://www.nature.com/scitable/knowledge/library/population-limiting-factors-17059572
Campbell Biology 9th ed. Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

The History of Life on Earth – Crash Course Ecology #1

With a solid understanding of biology on the small scale under our belts, it’s time for the long view – for the next twelve weeks, we’ll be learning how the living things that we’ve studied interact with and influence each other and their environments. Life is powerful, and in order to understand how living systems work, you first have to understand how they originated, developed and diversified over the past 4.5 billion years of Earth’s history. Hang on to your hats as Hank tells us the epic drama that is the history of life on Earth.

Like CrashCourse on Facebook! http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse
Follow CrashCourse on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse

Table of Contents
1) Archaean & Proterozoic Eons 01:53
a) Protobionts 03:54
b) Prokaryotes 04:18
c) Eukaryotes 06:06

2) Phanerozoic Eon 06:42
a) Cambrian Explosion 06:49
b) Ordovician Period 07:36
c) Devonian Period 07:48
d) Carboniferous Period 08:13
e) Permian Period 09:10

References and licenses for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-2zRD

crashcourse, biology, ecology, hank green, history, life, human, earth, RNA, genetic material, protobionts, DNA, prokaryote, archaea, archaean, eon, proterozoic, era, period, epoch, fossil record, atmosphere, geologic, time, cyanobacteria, photosynthesis, oxygen revolution, change, environment, eukaryote, endosymbiosis, mitochondria, plastid, algae, cambrian explosion, diversity, animal, evolution, phanerozoic, phyla, ordovician, plant, carboniferous, fossil fuel, system, permian, pangaea, gymnosperm, archosaur, dinosaur, species, extinction, event, asteroid, niche, competition, resource, jurassic, angiosperm, insect, coevolution, bird, mammal, flora, fauna, relationship Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse

%d bloggers like this: